Hahm Research Group

Department of Chemistry

Georgetown University

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Welcome to the Hahm Group website! Our research interests lie in physical chemistry, material science, interfacial and surface science, as well as the biomedical applications of nanomaterials. Our highly interdisciplinary research program covers from the synthesis, to property characterization, to ultimate applications of polymeric, metallic, and semiconducting nanomaterials. Our current study focuses on one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures such as nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods. We study fundamental properties of various 1D nanomaterials in order to identify their unique physical, chemical, optical, and electrical properties. We then apply the newly discovered properties to help solving critical and challenging problems in biomedical and clinical research. For example, we carry out advanced detection of DNA and protein biomarkers using novel nanorod-based platforms. In order to facilitate the assembly of functional nanomaterial devices with no post-synthesis fabrication steps, we also investigate biologically inspired synthetic routes for producing well-controlled nanomaterials. Such efforts include the use of new biogenic catalysts and the application of self-assembled catalysts to build ready-to-use nanomaterial constructs directly upon synthesis. We also carry out fundamental studies on soft matter such as biological and polymeric nanostructures. We investigate unique adsorption characteristics of proteins on nanoscale polymer surfaces at or below the single biomolecule level. We provide much needed, direct experimental proof of important protein adsorption steps and elucidate new mechanisms and kinetics pertaining to nanoscale protein adsorption.

We are in the Department of Chemistry at Georgetown University, and a part of the Institute of the Soft Matter Synthesis and Metrology (ISM2). For a more detailed description of our research, feel free to explore our group web site or contact Professor Hahm.